Popularity ratings on the decline: Suddenly the Germans are discovering the dark side of the Greens

News

Post Tags


Opinion Popularity ratings on the decline

Suddenly, the Germans discover the dark side of the Greens

Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock, Economics Minister Robert Habeck and WELT author Jacques Schuster Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock, Economics Minister Robert Habeck and WELT author Jacques Schuster

Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock, Economics Minister Robert Habeck and WELT author Jacques Schuster

Source: Maja Hitij/Getty Images; Claudius Plough

The supposed new openness of the Greens delighted many Germans. A certain authoritarian educational regime and an ideological obstinacy, for example in nuclear power, the voters forgot in their delirium. A reality check later, they issue a bitter bill.

Dhe signature of our time is green. Or was she green? Anyway, the color seems to be fading.

If you follow the latest trend in Germany (all details can be found here), the popularity ratings of Annalena Baerbocks and Robert Habecks collapse. Only 35 percent of Germans are satisfied with the Economics Minister. If the polls continue to go down, Finance Minister Christian Lindner will be ahead of him.

The FDP leader currently has 33 percent. It looks similarly bleak when it comes to which party the best climate policy operates. At the top for the first time is the answer “no party” or a dry “don’t know”. The Greens lose a brutal 15 percentage points, but are still ahead with 32 percent.

also read

Struggling for money: Lisa Paus (Greens), Christian Lindner (FDP) and Boris Pistorius (SPD) (from left)

Climate, Social, Defence

The reason for the crash has less to do with themselves than with the image that many Germans had of this party and especially of Robert Habeck in the general acoustics of the time. They only saw the front of the Greens, which stands for a fragrant environmental and climate protection, but gives the impression that the turnaround there will only hurt the evil industry, if one disregards the construction of annoying wind turbines.

Habeck’s way of translating Heinrich von Kleist’s essay “About the gradual realization of thoughts while speaking” into daily politics and covering one or the other impertinence with the friendly, harmless smile of a stuffed animal did the rest.

The fact that the Greens – ultimately – still advocate an authoritarian educational regimen in order to push through the climate change as quickly as possible, that they are still ideologically stubborn, as their stubborn no to nuclear power shows – many Germans forgot all this in the Eiapopaia of rapture about the supposed new green party Openness.

also read

The Isar 2 nuclear power plant is one of the last plants of its kind to go offline in mid-April

However, since the Greens Gas and oil heating have declared war, the mirage has dissipated, many Germans sit in their warm living rooms and take offense. More and more they look at the other, the dark side of the green that has always existed.

It’s almost like in real life, as sometimes in a job or as in not a few marriages: you only feel the disadvantages. That’s not fair. The greens haven’t changed. But when was the zeitgeist ever fair?

You can listen to our WELT podcasts here

In order to display embedded content, your revocable consent to the transmission and processing of personal data is required, since the providers of the embedded content as third-party providers require this consent [In diesem Zusammenhang können auch Nutzungsprofile (u.a. auf Basis von Cookie-IDs) gebildet und angereichert werden, auch außerhalb des EWR]. By setting the switch to “on”, you agree to this (which can be revoked at any time). This also includes your consent to the transfer of certain personal data to third countries, including the USA, in accordance with Art. 49 (1) (a) GDPR. You can find more information about this. You can withdraw your consent at any time via the switch and via privacy at the bottom of the page.

“Kick-off Politics” is WELT’s daily news podcast. The most important topic analyzed by WELT editors and the dates of the day. Subscribe to the podcast at Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music or directly via RSS feed.

This is where you will find third-party content

In order to display embedded content, your revocable consent to the transmission and processing of personal data is required, since the providers of the embedded content as third-party providers require this consent [In diesem Zusammenhang können auch Nutzungsprofile (u.a. auf Basis von Cookie-IDs) gebildet und angereichert werden, auch außerhalb des EWR]. By setting the switch to “on”, you agree to this (which can be revoked at any time). This also includes your consent to the transfer of certain personal data to third countries, including the USA, in accordance with Art. 49 (1) (a) GDPR. You can find more information about this. You can withdraw your consent at any time via the switch and via privacy at the bottom of the page.



Source link

Comments are closed.